A flower-tinted cheek
Hafiz (c. 1320-1389), Persian poet
translation by Gertrude Bell (1868-1926), British writer

A flower-tinted cheek, the flowery close
Of the fair earth,, these are enough for me,
Enough that in the meadow wanes and grows
The shadow of a graceful cypress-tree.
I am no lover of hypocrisy;
Of all the treasures that the earth can boast,
A brimming cup of wine I prize the most
This is enough for me!

To them that here renowned for virtue live,
A heavenly palace is the meet reward;
To me, the drunkard and the beggar, give
The temple of the grape with red wine stored!
Beside a river seat thee on the sward;
It floweth past so flows thy life away,
So sweetly, swiftly, fleets our little day
Swift, but enough for me!

Look upon all the gold in the world's mart,
On all the tears the world hath shed in vain;
Shall they not satisfy thy craving heart?
I have enough of loss, enough of gain;
I have my Love, what more can I obtain?
Mine is the joy of her companionship
Whose healing lip is laid upon my lip
This is enough for me!

I pray thee send not forth my naked soul
From its poor house to seek for Paradise
Though heaven and earth before me God unroll,
Back to thy village still my spirit flies.
And, Hafiz, at the door of Kismet lies
No just complaint a mind like water clear,
A song that swells and dies upon the ear,
These are enough for thee!

#6 from Poems From The Divan of Hafiz (1897)


courtesy of  vintagewinepoems.com