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from Poems From The Divan of Hafiz (1897)
translation by Gertrude Bell (1868-1926)

The Rhyme Maker
Hafiz
Hafiz
c.1320-1389


Themes:  Bad Times


NOTES:
This poem is addressed to a distant lover, estranged from the poet's affections. The opening stanza refers to the tale of two persons prominent in Christian, Hebrew, and Islamic myth: King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba.  Specifically, our poet refers to a well-known story in his day in which King Solomon engenders the loyalty (fidelity) of said Queen by sending a message to her via a Lapwing, a rather large bird known for its loud cry and vast wingspan.

stanza 3: “meed”: a noun rarely used today, meaning a deserved reward or "fair share".

Last stanza: In Persian culture, the gifting of a robe and horse was a gesture conveying much honor upon the recipient.

 -S.H. Bass 

Special Notes:  Persian Wine Poetry
                                     Hafiz


more Hafiz at
vintagewinepoems.com
 
translations by Gertrude Bell
A flower-tinted cheek
Arise! and fill a golden goblet up
Arise, oh Cupbearer, rise!

Forget not when dear friend
From out the street of So-and-So
From the garden of Heaven
Hast thou forgotten
Lay not reproach at the drunkard's door

Mirth, Spring, to linger in a garden fair

My friend has fled
Not all the sum of earthly happiness

Not one is filled with madness
Oh Cup-bearer, set my glass afire

Singer, sweet Singer, fresh notes strew

The bird of gardens sang unto the rose
The breath of Dawn
The rose has flushed red
The rose is not fair
The secret draft of wine

What drunkenness is this
What is wrought in the forge
Where is my ruined life


translations by Richard Le Gallienne 
Comrades, the morning breaks
Happy returns of this good day

Heavens! do you think this is a time

Last night, as half asleep I dreaming lay

My hermitage the tavern is

No! Saki – take the wine away

O, I've good news for you – the spring

Once more red wine

Saki, for God's love, come and fill

The Abbot of the Wine-House

Tis an unstable world

Two Gallons of old wine

What ails thee, Saki! Wine

When thus I sit with roses in my breast

With last night’s wine still singing


More English translations of Hafiz:
Song of Hafiz (unknown - 1875)
The Feast Of Spring (Whinfield - 1917)


Wind from the east, oh Lapwing of the day
Hafiz (c. 1320-1389), Persian poet
translation by Gertrude Bell (1868-1926), British writer


Wind from the east, oh Lapwing of the day,
I send thee to my Lady, though the way
Is far to Saba, where I bid thee fly;
Lest in the dust thy tameless wings should lie,
Broken with grief, I send thee to thy nest,
Fidelity.

Or far or near there is no halting-place
Upon Love's road absent, I see thy face,
And in thine ear my wind-blown greetings sound,
North winds and east waft them where they are bound,
Each morn and eve convoys of greeting fair
I send to thee.

Unto mine eyes a stranger, thou that art
A comrade ever-present to my heart,
What whispered prayers and what full meed of praise
I send to thee.

Lest Sorrow's army waste thy heart's domain,
I send my life to bring thee peace again,
Dear life thy ransom! From thy singers learn
How one that longs for thee may weep and burn;
Sonnets and broken words, sweet notes and songs
I send to thee.

Give me the cup! a voice rings in mine ears
Crying: "Bear patiently the bitter years!
For all thine ills, I send thee heavenly grace.
God the Creator mirrored in thy face
Thine eyes shall see, God's image in the glass
I send to thee.

"Hafiz, thy praise alone my comrades sing;
Hasten to us, thou that art sorrowing!
A robe of honor and a harnessed steed
I send to thee."


#3 from Poems From The Divan of Hafiz (1897)



Poems From The Divan of Hafiz (1897)
translation by Gertrude Bell (1868-1926)

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